College of Medicine / Undergraduate Medical Education / Medical Student Courses


       

Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine
Florida Atlantic University
777 Glades Road
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561-297-4828
COMinfo@health.fau.edu

Medical Student Courses

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DESCRIPTION:  The FBS course is designed to provide students with a broad foundation in critical biomedical science subject areas, including biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, pathology, physiology, histology, anatomy, and embryology. The FBS course focuses first on biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, pharmacology and an introduction to the anatomical sciences. The course then builds on and extends this foundation into the areas of microbiology, immunology and pathology.   

The course will be taught in 19 weeks and consists of lectures, problem based learning (PBL) sessions, team based learning (TBL) sessions, small group discussions, and laboratory activities. 

DirectorsVajaya Iragavarapu-Charyulu, Phd.  and Darin Trekla, MD, PhD

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION:  The Neuroscience and Behavior Course provides the basic concepts and vocabulary in the areas of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory systems, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neuropathology, neurology and psychiatry. The course uses an integrated approach by combining lectures, problem-based learning (PBL) and anatomy laboratory instruction. The PBL sessions in small groups will provide the fundamental knowledge of common neurological and psychiatric disorders that will be complemented by lectures for specific diseases. The presentation of the neuroanatomy component will emphasize correlations with clinical cases and lead to the localization of brain lesions. The instruction in gross of anatomy of the head and neck will be integrated with clinical correlates. 

DirectorRainald Schmidt-Kastner, M.D.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION:  Pathophysiology and Therapeutics 1 provides basic concepts and vocabulary pertaining to the anatomy, chemistry, histology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology of human nutrition, hematology and the gastrointestinal and hepatic systems, including normal nutrition and diagnosis and management of common nutritional disorders.  The course uses a variety of teaching formats, including didactic lectures, large group team-based learning (TBL), small group Inquiry (IQ) cases and pathology labs, and Simulation Center instruction.  IQ cases cover learning objectives not included in the lectures, so that the two formats complement but do not substitute for one another.  For most sessions, there are recommended readings in the core texts.  The Simulation Center component will emphasize correlations with clinical cases and differential diagnosis and treatment of digestive system lesions. 

DirectorSteven Lewis, M.D. and Dayna Weinert, M.D.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION:  The Pathophysiology and Therapeutics 2 course provides the basic concepts and vocabulary in the areas of the anatomy, chemistry, histology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and related hematologic systems .The course uses an integrated approach by combining lectures, problem-based learning (IQ cases), team based learning lessons, and simulated laboratory instruction. The IQ case sessions, in small groups, will provide the fundamental knowledge of common cardiovascular and respiratory disorders that will be complemented by lectures for specific diseases. The take-home IQ cases and pharmacology mini cases will reinforce major themes and concepts delivered in lecture. The Simulation Center component will emphasize the clinical process of history, physical exam and medical testing to develop differential diagnoses and treat. 

DirectorsIra Gelb, M.D., Steven Lewis, Ph.D. and Dayna Weinert, M.D.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION  The Pathophysiology and Therapeutics 3 course provides the basic concepts and vocabulary in the areas of the anatomy, chemistry, histology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology in three separate systems - renal, reproduction and endocrine.  The renal section teaches students the structure, physiology, pathophysiology and pathology of the kidneys and genitourinary tract.  The physiology section consists of fluid balance, electrolyte balance and acid base balance as well as an approach to disorders in these areas of kidney function. Diseases of the kidneys and collecting system will be reviewed.  The reproductive section covers basic concepts and vocabulary of male and female biology as it relates to pathology, gynecological diseases and infertility.   The endocrine section covers the anatomy, histology, physiology, pathophysiology and pathology of endocrine organs.  The course is taught with an integrated approach which combines lectures, pathology laboratories, inquiry (IQ) cases (a form of problem-based learning), take-home problems sets (minicases), team based learning (TBL), a visit to a dialysis center and simulation center instruction. The IQ cases consists of small groups which provide the fundamental knowledge of common renal, endocrine and reproductive diseases that will be complemented by lectures about specific diseases and pathophysiology. The take-home problem sets (minicases) will reinforce the major themes and concepts delivered in lecture. The simulation center and dialysis experience will provide real and simulated clinical experience. 

DirectorParvathi Perumareddi, D.O.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION :  The Pathophysiology and Therapeutic 4 course is a 6-week course in the spring semester of Year 2 that builds on the foundation in gross anatomy, histology, chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and immunology taught during the Fundamentals of Biomedical Science courses in fall semester of Year 1. The course is designed to provide students with the principles of pathology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and basic treatment rationale pertaining to infectious, immunologic and hematologic diseases. Integrated to this course are core principles of dermatological and ophthalmologic disorders. The course objectives focus on the primary disorders caused by infection, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity and hematological malignancies. The course uses an integrated approach by combining lectures, problem-based learning (IQ Cases), problem sets (i.e., minicases), and simulated laboratory instruction.  IQ cases in the small-group setting use a set of core cases to focus students on pathophysiology, diagnosis, public health aspects, and a first approach to management and will be complemented by lectures for specific diseases. Minicases will reinforce major themes and concepts delivered in lecture. The laboratory component will emphasize the use of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and monitoring of immunological disorders.

Director : Mahyar Nouri-Shirazi, D.V.M., Ph.D.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION Synthesis and Transition (S&T) is 2-week course at the beginning of Year 3 designed to help students synthesize knowledge acquired in the first two years of medical school to prepare them for a smooth transition to the Year 3 clerkships.  The course includes 1) Case Seminar, a complex PBL/IQ case that integrates across multiple organ systems and focuses on differential diagnosis and treatment decisions; and 2) Sim center and interactive work on clinical reasoning and clinical skills building across multiple core disciplines.

Director : Dawn Sherling, M.D.

Staff contacts: Valerie Riccardi

DESCRIPTION:  The Foundations of Medicine (FOM) course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles necessary to become a competent, compassionate and professional physician with opportunities for direct patient care. FOM is divided into three courses: FOM 1, 2 and 3 which will run throughout the first two years of medical school. This separation is designed to provide a summative assessment to students at the end of each FOM course.

The goal of the FOM 1 course is to assist students in developing the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors that are needed to interview and examine patients; to answer clinical questions; to understand the importance of patient advocacy and disease prevention; to instill the foundation for the ethical and legal framework of patient care; and to integrate the knowledge of basic science, clinical skills and the science of clinical practice components. The course also introduces the skills needed to provide care to specific groups of patients such as elderly patients.

Directors: Peter Averkiou, M.D., Mario Jacomino, M.D., M.P.H. and Dawn Sherling, M.D.

Staff contacts: Ashia Milligan

DESCRIPTION:  The Foundations of Medicine (FOM) course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles necessary to become a competent, compassionate and professional physician with opportunities for direct patient care. FOM is divided into three courses: FOM 1, 2 and 3 which will run throughout the first two years of medical school. This separation is designed to provide a summative assessment to students at the end of each FOM course.  The overall objectives and content areas for the FOM 2 course in Year 1 are to continue the progression of the objectives of the FOM 1 course, adding new components and clinical skills at an advanced level. 

The FOM 2 course is intended to assist students to deepen their knowledge and improve their skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to interview and examine the patient, to answer clinical questions, to understand the importance of patient advocacy and disease prevention, to explore barriers to health care, and to instill the foundation for the ethical and legal framework of patient care.  Students continue to develop skills to strengthen the patient physician relationship.  Additional Interprofessional Education sessions with the students and faculty from the FAU College of Nursing and School of Social Work will cover Financing of the health care system and continue the SAGE mentor visits that started last semester.

DirectorsPeter Averkiou, M.D., Mario Jacomino, M.D., M.P.H. and Dawn Sherling, M.D.

Staff contacts: Ashia Milligan

DESCRIPTION:  The Foundations of Medicine (FOM) course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles necessary to become a competent, compassionate and professional physician with opportunities for direct patient care. FOM is divided into three courses: FOM 1, 2 and 3 which will run throughout the first two years of medical school. This separation is designed to provide a summative assessment to students at the end of each FOM course.  The overall objectives and content areas for the FOM 3 course in Year 2 are to continue the progression of the objectives of the FOM 1 & 2 courses, adding new components and clinical skills at an advanced level. 

The goal of the FOM 3 course is to assist the students in expanding their medical knowledge and to refine their clinical skills, attitudes and behaviors needed to interview and examine the patient; to generate and answer clinical questions; to develop their clinical reasoning; to understand the importance of patient advocacy and disease prevention; to explore the barriers to health care and to instill the foundation for the ethical and legal framework of patient care.  The course also introduces the skills needed to care for specific groups of patients such as children, the elderly, LGBT individuals, as well as patients at the end of life. 

DirectorsPeter Averkiou, M.D., Mario Jacomino, M.D., M.P.H. and Dawn Sherling, M.D.

Staff contacts: Ashia Milligan

DESCRIPTION:  This two-week capstone course is offered in March at the end of the 4th year.  The goal of this course is to prepare students to work effectively as interns, residents and practicing physicians. Additionally, it will help students to develop the knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to be successful in their professional lives. Activities that will be covered include rapid response scenarios; central venous catheter and/or interosseus line insertion; airway management; multitasking, organization and prioritization; advanced communication skills; reflective exercises; and teaching skills.  These will be taught by using simulation scenarios, team-based learning exercises and larger group lectures.

DirectorsMichelle Schwartz, M.D. and Suzanne Weiner, M.D.

 



Last Modified 11/8/16